A funny, but apparently genuine, casting call seeks Yellowknifers to play aurora tourists, gangsters… and a “creepy-looking” old man.

Rachelle Francoeur told Cabin Radio she’s working as a location scout and casting agent for Television Broadcasts Ltd, or TVB – one of Hong Kong’s largest broadcasters.

According to Francoeur, TVB is filming its Christmas special in Yellowknife next month.

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The show carries the working title An Unexpected Journey. Francoeur says the script appears to be a comedy full of “dark humour.”

“It’s about two people who win tickets to come to Yellowknife,” she said. “They are coming over here and will have a bunch of adventures.

“This will be for national television broadcast in Hong Kong … it’s a lot of people, for us. Millions of viewers.”

Know anyone creepy enough?

There are nine paid acting jobs in total up for grabs, spread across three types of role.

The first role is described as “40s and up, creepy-looking, white beard, Caucasian male, possibly bigger in stature.” If you know anyone who fits the bill, they’ll have eight hours of work paying $500.

“They do insist on the creepy-looking,” said Francoeur when Cabin Radio queried the unusually descriptive request.

“For that character, specifically, he will have things to say. You need to be a bit creepy-looking.”

Two people, aged in their 20s to 40s, will play roles described as: “Menacing, threatening, but also goofy and funny. Non-Asian preferred.” Those roles offer six hours of work for $300 each.

Lastly, six extras aged over 18 are required to be shown standing at night, watching the aurora. Again, the casting call asks that they preferably be non-Asian. The pay is $125 each for three to four hours of work.

(Auditions have closed since this article was first published, and we have removed the producer’s contact information at their request.)

Francoeur said the production is expected to be filming in Yellowknife from November 20-29. TVB could not be immediately reached to confirm details of the production.

“I will do the casting with anyone who gets in touch – they can read the lines, if they are the creepy older man or the gangsters,” said Francoeur. “The extras don’t have any lines so it’s just, like, hey, do you want to be on television?

“It’s easy money, if you think about it.”

Asked if she expected to have any trouble finding a creepy-looking older white guy locally, Francoeur said: “No. That should be easy.”