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Museum extends Treaty 11 display after Covid-19 closure


An exhibition allowing NWT residents to see the original Treaty 11 document has been extended until November 21, the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre says.

The museum, in Yellowknife, has been displaying Treaty 11 since mid-September but spent some of that time closed due to the fall outbreak of Covid-19 in the city.

Each week, a page of the document is being turned to display pages that focus on different communities. The page-turning was also paused during the recent outbreak.

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The museum reopened on October 30 and will now display the Tsiigehtchic and Fort McPherson page this week, the Fort Liard and Behchokǫ̀ page from November 8-14, and the title page from November 15 until the exhibition ends.

Signed in 1921, Treaty 11 outlined the surrender of Indigenous lands in exchange for treaty payments, tools and supplies, promises of education, and government-regulated hunting and fishing rights.

More than 20 First Nations and some Métis people would eventually adhere to Treaty 11, covering almost a million square kilometres of the present-day NWT, Nunavut, and Yukon.

The exhibition, marking a century since that signing, is open from 10am until 5pm between Tuesday and Sunday each week. Face masks must be worn and proof of vaccination is required for anyone aged 12 or over.

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